What make a good Photography workshop?

When I originally thought about writing this post I did not imagine that it would be that hard.  When I started researching some ideas it dawned on me that there are so many workshops around covering everything from 1 day basic field to 5 day intensive photo editing workshops. Covering a full range of prices, accommodation options and group sizes. So it is clear that it's not just about picking a good workshop. You need to pick a good workshop for you, that meets your needs.The more I wrote the more the piece developed into a rant about what I considered to be a bad workshop, and it was never intended to be a negative piece. I wanted to suggest a few points that the prospective workshop attendee may want to consider and a few ideas for those who run workshops to consider. So I have modified and cut down the article to these few points.

  1. Pick a workshop style that suits your needs (class room based, field based, mixed etc...)
    Dartmoor 20 Photography Workshop

  2. Don't be afraid to suggest topics you would like covered - if the workshop is not flexible it's not for you.

  3. Favour content over location. You don't need great scenery to learn. The skills you learn can be taken to great scenery when ever you want.

  4. Consider leader to pupil ratio. You deserve individual attention on a workshop. About 3 is right.

  5. The best photographers are not always the best teachers. Don't judge only by the quality of a photographers work. Find out what his past participants have to say.

  6. The workshop leader should concentrate on leading the group not stop to make his or her own images. Unless it is part of a demonstration.

  7. The workshop should be set a level appropriate for your skills and experience. And yet flexible enough to scale up or back depending on your progress.

There are probably many other items that you could consider. Why not contact me and let me know?

 

Derwentwater
Derwentwater, Lake District National Park